Tag Archives: toxic foods for pets

Are These Pet Toxins Already in Your Home?

Believe it or not, you most likely already have a variety of potential pet toxins inside your home. Don’t worry, though—with a few simple precautions, you can keep your animal companion safe and sound! Learn more here from your vet in Roanoke, VA.

Pesticides

Do you use pesticides or rodenticides around your home to ward off pesky intruders? Remember that pesticide products are poisons, designed to kill the critters that come in contact with them. That’s why it’s important to choose pet-proof pesticides or go with alternative pest-control options that aren’t toxic to pets, like traps. Ask your vet for further advice.

Dangerous Foods

A great many human foods can prove harmful to a pet. The list includes grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, avocado, chocolate, candy, salty items like chips and pretzels, fatty or rich foods, and alcoholic beverages, among others. To protect your pet, don’t leave foods out on the kitchen table or countertops where pets may be able to reach them. Instead, store foods in cabinets or the refrigerator where they belong.

Human Medication

Various human medicines—standard painkillers like Advil or Motrin, antidepressants, cough syrup, all sorts of prescription drugs, and more—can prove toxic to a pet who manages to get their paws on them! A determined pet may even be able to chew right through a child-proof plastic bottle cap. Store all medicines inside a closed cabinet or drawer where your pet won’t be able to reach, and store your pet’s own medicine in a separate area from human medications so the two don’t get mixed up.

Poisonous Plant Life

Plenty of plants and flowers can harm a pet who ingests them. Oleander, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, philodendron, rhododendron (also called azalea), lilies, tulips, the sago palm, a variety of aloe plants, and ivy are just a few examples. Inside and outside your home, make sure you’re not harboring a harmful plant variety. Ask your vet what kinds of toxic plants are most common in the area where you live.

Cleaning Products

While a pet isn’t likely to seek out a cleaning solution to ingest, you’ll want to play it safe. Everything from household disinfectants and air fresheners to bleach-based products and carpet cleaner could cause serious problems! Keep the supply closet shut tightly at all times.

To learn more about pet toxins at home, call your Roanoke, VA veterinary clinic.

Keeping Your Pet Safe on the Fourth of July

In just a few days, we’ll be celebrating Independence Day with family and friends. Are you planning on including your animal companion in the festivities? Remember: the Fourth presents a few pet hazards to be aware of! Learn more below from a vet in Roanoke, VA.

Fireworks

Tempting as it may be, don’t bring your dog to the local fireworks display. Each year, thousands of pets are frightened into running off thanks to the deafening booms of fireworks. You don’t want to search for a lost pet in the dead of night! Keep your animal friend safely secured at home in an escape-proof area. If you plan on setting off smaller pyrotechnics at home—firecrackers, sparklers, and the like—it’s always best to keep your pet indoors.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of common party and picnic foods can prove harmful for pets. The list includes onions, garlic, chocolate and candies, avocado, salty foods like chips or pretzels, grapes and raisins, fatty foods, and much more. Alcohol is another big pet no-no. If your celebration will include adult beverages, make sure your animal companion doesn’t have a chance to sneak a sip! To be safe, keep your pet far away from the treat table; give them their own meal instead to keep them satisfied.

Heat and Humidity

The Fourth of July means heat and humidity, and that can be a dangerous combination for your four-legged companion. Make sure that your pet doesn’t stay outside for too long this holiday; allow them back indoors, where it’s comfortable and air-conditioned, on a frequent basis. Also make sure that there is a dish of cool, fresh water for your pet to drink from as they please. This is the best way to avoid deadly dehydration!

Outdoor Pests

When your pet does venture outdoors, summertime pests like fleas, ticks, heartworms, roundworms, flatworms, and much more present a real danger. If your pet isn’t set up to fend off these pests, infestations and infections can result that will cause serious health trouble! Keep your pet on high-quality pest preventatives to ward off fleas, ticks, and worms—talk to your vet if your pet is in need. You can also reduce the number of mosquitoes in your yard by removing sources of standing water, trimming back tall shrubbery and grasses, and getting rid of any garbage lying about.

For more tips, call your Roanoke, VA veterinary clinic today.